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Manx Care Has Failed


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I complained, on here, about the long, long wait to get treatment and for some reason, suddenly,  everything has swung into top gear. Had a long awaited meeting with the consultant, a long awaited CT scan and treatment has started with another CT scan in four weeks.

Maybe it's just because my problem has become more acute, (I don't know), or things are starting to look up with our health service.

Either way, I am profoundly grateful.

I also agree about the blood tests via RCH, they always have been and continue to be just how the service should work. Please don't close RCH and leave us with a poorer compromise service at Nobles.

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There have been some throw-away casual comments / assumptions about RDCH.

So, just a few things  here to consider :

It is busier than any time in its long history.

It has provided the mainstay of minor injury provision and  orthopaedic  clinics - and follow ups during the difficulties of the Pandemic.

The outpatient consulting rooms where these patients were seen were built with charitable funding.

The X-ray department was provided at no cost to the tax-payer and subsequent upgrades have been funded and will be funded from hospital charitable organisations. 

Martin ward ( refurbished at no cost to the tax payer by a hospital charity  is ussualy full with rehabilitation patients,  releasing beds in Nobles.

The Renal unit ( fully equipped at no cost to the tax payer by a hospital charity) is essential fo the Island  cope with increasing dialysis demands and provides dialysis cover for visitors for which their Health Trusts are charged .

The operating theatre ( provided at no cost to the tax payer, funded entirely by a hospital charity  ) provides whole-Island services including  Plastic Surgery.Prof Viaude - from Whiston Hosp., now resident here  carries out surgery here.Where previously patients had to travel off Island they can have this in Ramsey.
RDCH provides the Island’s dermatology service in the same facilities .. which were again funded by a  hospital charity.

The physio / occupational therapy unit  was built at no cost to the tax payer - again by the same local charity.

The equipment on Martin ward - ditto

The refurbishment of MIU, the entrance upgrade and the waiting room -ditto.

The emergency helicopter landing site - ditto

The car park extension -ditto.

There are dozens of other smaller items.

Remarkably well -supported.

There   is also something else which is not only special, it is  bordering on unique in the NHS these days:

Based  on what one can observe by the responses, and general demeanor  of  its staff ..morale does seem  high.

This observation was similar to the view when the Hospital  was independently reviewed a few years back where the report remarked in the

“ Enthusiasm  “ of its staff.

Even if that is  not specially acknowledged - or  celebrated, it at least needs careful analysis-   if only to see if it can be replicated elsewhere.

 

As an edit…

Somehow I managed to not mention  the Wound  Management Clinic -the jewel in RDCH’s crown for many.

From all over the Island, they see patients who have serious,  debilitating on- going problems.

Not gee -whizz, high tech stuff, but things that have a major ,very debilitating and profoundly  negative impact and depressing impact on life for some.

The unit has  a reputation of taking on - and succeeding in managing   “problems” that other agencies have, for whatever reason,  been unable to deal with.

-and largely their equipment has been obtained without troubling the tax- payer.That same source has funded attendance at off- Island training courses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by hampsterkahn
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27 minutes ago, hampsterkahn said:

here   is also something else which is not only special, it is  bordering on unique in the NHS these days:

Based  on what one can observe by the responses, and general demeanor  of  its staff ..morale does seem  high.

This observation was similar to the view when the Hospital  was independently reviewed a few years back where the report remarked in the

“ Enthusiasm  “ of its staff.

Even if that is  not specially acknowledged - or  celebrated, it at least needs careful analysis-   if only to see if it can be replicated elsewhere.

Nobles used to be like that - before:

a) the effective budget cut when the new hospital was opened, thus ensuring that the budget was “overspent” every year thereafter by approximately the same amount (resulting in pressures to “economise”) - and

b) the rise of the “Cult of the Managers”, at the expense of the front line staff - you know the effect that this continues to have on both budget and front line morale

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19 hours ago, Jarndyce said:

Nobles used to be like that - before:

a) the effective budget cut when the new hospital was opened, thus ensuring that the budget was “overspent” every year thereafter by approximately the same amount (resulting in pressures to “economise”) - and

b) the rise of the “Cult of the Managers”, at the expense of the front line staff - you know the effect that this continues to have on both budget and front line morale

What is Hoopers stance on this Manx care failing, the new DHSC and new team of senior management staff is supposed to make sure Manx Care do their job on budget.   Nothing changed just millions more for new management jobs and still millions over budget. 
 

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20 hours ago, hampsterkahn said:

The X-ray department was provided at no cost to the tax-payer and subsequent upgrades have been funded and will be funded from hospital charitable organisations. 

etc. etc. "from hospital charitable organisations"....

At the Ramsey endoscopy public meeting a few years ago, I was astounded at the amount of  charitable money that had been raised for the Ramsey Hospital. I was also astounded by Couch's "I don't give a vermin's arse" attitude.

Both Allinson and Hooper were in the audience and I do not recall either saying anything of significance, if anything at all.

 

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On 8/10/2022 at 12:00 AM, hampsterkahn said:

 

There have been some throw-away casual comments / assumptions about RDCH.

So, just a few things  here to consider :

[etc.]

All of your points are factual, but can I add some construcive criticism?  For a variety of historical and current (e.g. legacies) reasons, the charities are wealthy and want to spend money on their charitable objective, which is the Cottage.  In my view, they - in collusion with the local GPs until a few years ago (one of whom was Sideshow Bob) - they have started to see it as their hospital to do with as they see fit.  Money has been thrown at the place and all sorts of kit and caboodle has been bought.  As far as I know, the problem is that there has never been a strategic plan for the unit, and so everything in its links with Noble's is completely disjointed.  To my mind, that is a recipe for waste, and if a health service wastes money, those funds cannot be spent on care.

I should add that one oif the charities has for many years been the personal fiefdom of one Leonard Singer.  Remember him?  Enough said...

Edited by Boo Gay'n
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Tried to make a GP appointment this morning. The surgery have told me there's nothing available for the foreseeable future. 

I've previously had to wait about 5 weeks at times (and it's not an emergency so I don't mind), but being told point blank there's none available at all is a new low. 

They blamed an island wide GP shortage. 

Is anyone else finding this at their surgery? 

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2 hours ago, Boo Gay'n said:

All of your points are factual, but can I add some construcive criticism?  For a variety of historical and current (e.g. legacies) reaons, the charities are wealthy and want to spend money on their charitable objective, which is the Cottage.  In my view, they - in collusion with the local GPs until a few years ago (one of whom was Sideshow Bob) - they have started to see it as their hospital to do with as they see fit.  Money has been thrown at the place and all sorts of kit and caboodle has been bought.  As far as I know, the problem is that there has never been a strategic plan for the unit, and so everything in its links with Noble's is completely disjointed.  To my mind, that is a recipe for waste, and if a health service wastes money, those funds cannot be spent on care.

I should add that one oif the charities has for many years been the personal fiefdom of one Leonard Singer.  Remember him?  Enough said...

That isn’t quite how it works - or at least how it worked.

The charities were invited to respond to a “wish -list “ of items or projects presented to them by the “Department” - for example, the 2015 “Strategic Plan” listed four or more,  from what I understand.

 

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On 8/10/2022 at 12:00 AM, hampsterkahn said:

 

There have been some throw-away casual comments / assumptions about RDCH.

So, just a few things  here to consider :

It is busier than any time in its long history.

It has provided the mainstay of minor injury provision and  orthopaedic  clinics - and follow ups during the difficulties of the Pandemic.

The outpatient consulting rooms where these patients were seen were built with charitable funding.

The X-ray department was provided at no cost to the tax-payer and subsequent upgrades have been funded and will be funded from hospital charitable organisations. 

Martin ward ( refurbished at no cost to the tax payer by a hospital charity  is ussualy full with rehabilitation patients,  releasing beds in Nobles.

The Renal unit ( fully equipped at no cost to the tax payer by a hospital charity) is essential fo the Island  cope with increasing dialysis demands and provides dialysis cover for visitors for which their Health Trusts are charged .

The operating theatre ( provided at no cost to the tax payer, funded entirely by a hospital charity  ) provides whole-Island services including  Plastic Surgery.Prof Viaude - from Whiston Hosp., now resident here  carries out surgery here.Where previously patients had to travel off Island they can have this in Ramsey.
RDCH provides the Island’s dermatology service in the same facilities .. which were again funded by a  hospital charity.

The physio / occupational therapy unit  was built at no cost to the tax payer - again by the same local charity.

The equipment on Martin ward - ditto

The refurbishment of MIU, the entrance upgrade and the waiting room -ditto.

The emergency helicopter landing site - ditto

The car park extension -ditto.

There are dozens of other smaller items.

Remarkably well -supported.

There   is also something else which is not only special, it is  bordering on unique in the NHS these days:

Based  on what one can observe by the responses, and general demeanor  of  its staff ..morale does seem  high.

This observation was similar to the view when the Hospital  was independently reviewed a few years back where the report remarked in the

“ Enthusiasm  “ of its staff.

Even if that is  not specially acknowledged - or  celebrated, it at least needs careful analysis-   if only to see if it can be replicated elsewhere.

 

As an edit…

Somehow I managed to not mention  the Wound  Management Clinic -the jewel in RDCH’s crown for many.

From all over the Island, they see patients who have serious,  debilitating on- going problems.

Not gee -whizz, high tech stuff, but things that have a major ,very debilitating and profoundly  negative impact and depressing impact on life for some.

The unit has  a reputation of taking on - and succeeding in managing   “problems” that other agencies have, for whatever reason,  been unable to deal with.

-and largely their equipment has been obtained without troubling the tax- payer.That same source has funded attendance at off- Island training courses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agree with almost everything, but I am told that 'prof' Vaiude is a professor of art rather than professor of surgery/medicine. However he apparently is a qualified surgeon

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8 minutes ago, Dr. Grumpy said:

I am told that 'prof' Vaiude is a professor of art rather than professor of surgery/medicine. However he apparently is a qualified surgeon

According to this IOMG press release (so it must be true) Professor Partha Vaiude is a Consultant Plastic Surgeon, Isle of Man Skin Service Lead and Adjunct Professor of Art and Design at Liverpool John Moores University.

He's his staff page at JMU.

I'm not sure I quite like the idea of a plastic surgeon being too artistic.  What if he decides today he's going to influenced by Picasso and puts both eyes on the same side of the face?

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22 minutes ago, Dr. Grumpy said:

Agree with almost everything, but I am told that 'prof' Vaiude is a professor of art rather than professor of surgery/medicine. However he apparently is a qualified surgeon

Perhaps this explains the interplay between surgery and art, in plastics.

https://www.ljmu.ac.uk/about-us/staff-profiles/faculty-of-arts-professional-and-social-studies/liverpool-school-of-art-and-design/partha-vaiude

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2 hours ago, Roger Mexico said:

According to this IOMG press release (so it must be true) Professor Partha Vaiude is a Consultant Plastic Surgeon, Isle of Man Skin Service Lead and Adjunct Professor of Art and Design at Liverpool John Moores University.

He's his staff page at JMU.

I'm not sure I quite like the idea of a plastic surgeon being too artistic.  What if he decides today he's going to influenced by Picasso and puts both eyes on the same side of the face?

I almost went into plastic surgery, so know a little about the subject.

There were two camps - the artists and the geometers. I’d have definitely been in the latter group. I remember scrubbing in for a ‘nose job’ with the registrar doing the operation, and an old-school, arty-type consultant. The registrar did the operation perfectly competently when angles were measured etc, thought he’d finished, then the boss took over and said “just let me do this”. We couldn’t quite work out why, but the nose looked far better afterwards. This guy was also excellent at breasts and face lifts, and had a massive private cosmetic practice.

Another old school plastic surgeon I came across was a sculptor in his spare time. He did cranio-facial reconstructions in conjunction with a neurosurgeon for kids with funny-shaped heads, eyes too far apart etc. The neurosurgeon took everything apart while preserving and protecting the underlying brainy bits, and then stood back and allowed the plastic surgeon/sculptor to rearrange and put everything back together. Amazing stuff. 
 

It’s difficult to teach this sort of thing, and as I said I’d probably have become a technically competent reconstructive surgeon but would have lacked the artistry to be brilliant. This is what Partha is trying to overcome with his artistic leanings. He’s a great asset to the island and a really nice bloke. 

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