Jump to content

Drunk in charge of a mobility scooter, man loses licence?


Max Power
 Share

Recommended Posts

That young man has a TWOC and various other convictions record already, the length of an orangutans arm and more. It was a jaunt to Peel in a stolen Landy last time if my memory serves me?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

The Road Traffic Act excludes invalid carriages from being classed as a mechanically propelled vehicle in Section 69B. 

if the vehicle is mechanically propelled it shall be treated for the purposes of this Act and the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1985 as not being a motor vehicle;

The only thing that may exclude you is that it says that it should be being used in the “prescribed conditions”. Which appear to be that you do actually have a condition or disability that warrants the use of the scooter. 

From what I can see, if it’s a scooter used with a genuine need for it, you can’t be breathalysed for driving it, as it’s not a motor vehicle per the Act. 

I’d put forth that the chap in questions problem was the fact it was a borrowed scooter and he had no medical need for it that allowed him to be charged as he was. 

The bit you quote doesn't support that, I think.  It presumably refers more to whether you need a licence to drive it and so on.  But the bit of the RTA I quoted doesn't specify 'motor vehicle' but 'mechanically propelled' which the mobility scooter still is.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Roger Mexico said:

The bit you quote doesn't support that, I think.  It presumably refers more to whether you need a licence to drive it and so on.  But the bit of the RTA I quoted doesn't specify 'motor vehicle' but 'mechanically propelled' which the mobility scooter still is.

Cases have been dropped based on the UK’s laws which ours are based quite heavily on before now. They have the same wording.

But, the cases that were dropped, the driver/rider in question was allowed to ride. The exemption for mobility scooters as being classed as motor vehicles only existing when they’re being ridden under certain circumstances (by a disabled person, for repair etc etc.) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the early hours of every week-end in every town , village and hamlet somewhere,   on cue there will be  people competing to do silly things; sometimes these things will be  silly to the extent they  may end very  badly, even tragically and the silliness flip over into aggression and violence.

The Police can’t  charge someone with being a total bloody stupid , potentially dangerous, drunken,time-wasting, grade 1 twat,  so they have to asses the risk and have to find other ways, first to get them home safely, or if that clearly isn’t  going to work, find  charges, here even delving into the minutiae of  laws surrounding who and who should not or drive an invalid vehicle.

- but no doubt first impressions count.

 

 

Edited by hampsterkahn
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back in the day folk used to drive home from the pub because they were too pissed to walk. It was before these scooters were about, and they would have been ideal.

Edited by AOR
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Putting my tuppence in, these vehicles are a menace when driven on the highway. They should be covered by law not exempt, I doubt they would be passed as safe to travel on the highway, and those that venture to do so seem to be totally oblivious to the problems they are causing. These vehicles were not designed for road use, they are to help you get around shopping mall's and super markets. Tho some are morphing into electric cars by another name, you can even buy tandem models and believe me you do not want one of them trying to navigate Tesco's isles. Do not let these things become a swarm of locusts along with electric scooters. (two wheels, proper use of scooter) Another menace on our pavements and roads, we do not need.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Dirty Buggane said:

Putting my tuppence in, these vehicles are a menace when driven on the highway. They should be covered by law not exempt, I doubt they would be passed as safe to travel on the highway, and those that venture to do so seem to be totally oblivious to the problems they are causing. These vehicles were not designed for road use, they are to help you get around shopping mall's and super markets. Tho some are morphing into electric cars by another name, you can even buy tandem models and believe me you do not want one of them trying to navigate Tesco's isles. Do not let these things become a swarm of locusts along with electric scooters. (two wheels, proper use of scooter) Another menace on our pavements and roads, we do not need.

Class 3 mobility scooters by legal definition are made for road use. Plus, for some older people, they are their independence. 

The little two wheeled electric scooters for personal transport? They’re fantastic. I’ve explored cities on rental ones in various places, it’s a cheap and effective way to travel around town. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

 The little two wheeled electric scooters for personal transport? They’re fantastic. I’ve explored cities on rental ones in various places, it’s a cheap and effective way to travel around town. 

 

 

They seem to be rivaling the TT death rate in Liverpool

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Non-Believer said:

That young man has a TWOC and various other convictions record already, the length of an orangutans arm and more. It was a jaunt to Peel in a stolen Landy last time if my memory serves me?

Been involved in some serious stuff as well. Chronic offender since he was a young teenager. The softly softly approach didn't work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

2 deaths across the UK out of 32 areas where they’re being trialled. 

Out of 24.8 million miles travelled. 

We’ll not count the illegal ones for simplicities sake, much harder to get figures on those. 

The figures i am reading are 1,789 collisions with 9 fatalities. Figures are for England Scotland and Wales for the year 2021.  This is up from 1 in 2020. Figures are from the office of national statistics. There's lies, Dammed lies and then Statistics

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, AcousticallyChallenged said:

Cases have been dropped based on the UK’s laws which ours are based quite heavily on before now. They have the same wording.

But, the cases that were dropped, the driver/rider in question was allowed to ride. The exemption for mobility scooters as being classed as motor vehicles only existing when they’re being ridden under certain circumstances (by a disabled person, for repair etc etc.) 

I suspect dropping the cases would have been made on practical grounds and presumably in cases where there were no serious damage or injuries - just a drunk weaving their way home on their scooter.  They might also not have a licence to lose for other vehicular traffic and they can't be stopped from using the scooters, so all that they could be given would be a sort of informal caution.  But they wouldn't be immune from prosecution and of course there are equivalent offences for those using bicycles or just their own legs.

13 hours ago, Non-Believer said:

That young man has a TWOC and various other convictions record already, the length of an orangutans arm and more. It was a jaunt to Peel in a stolen Landy last time if my memory serves me?

No form of wheeled transport seems safe from him does it?  He was even accused of being involved in the theft of a lawnmower.  The landrover (which he helpfully documented on Snapchat) wasn't even he most recent brush with the law, he's since broken lockdown (it's always the ones you most suspect) and last October demanded a free lift from a police van.  The only thing he doesn't seem to have TWOC'd is one of Longworth's minibuses - or maybe no one noticed.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Roger Mexico said:

I suspect dropping the cases would have been made on practical grounds and presumably in cases where there were no serious damage or injuries - just a drunk weaving their way home on their scooter.  They might also not have a licence to lose for other vehicular traffic and they can't be stopped from using the scooters, so all that they could be given would be a sort of informal caution.  But they wouldn't be immune from prosecution and of course there are equivalent offences for those using bicycles or just their own legs.

No form of wheeled transport seems safe from him does it?  He was even accused of being involved in the theft of a lawnmower.  The landrover (which he helpfully documented on Snapchat) wasn't even he most recent brush with the law, he's since broken lockdown (it's always the ones you most suspect) and last October demanded a free lift from a police van.  The only thing he doesn't seem to have TWOC'd is one of Longworth's minibuses - or maybe no one noticed.

Alas, that's where it gets even murkier. See this as an example, where the CPS initially said it did count as a motor vehicle, but afterwards, themselves stated that it doesn't in fact apply to a mobility scooter.

https://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/20189428.rowntree-pensioners-name-cleared-cps-mobility-scooter-error/

Another example here states that he wouldn't have been banned, had he stuck to the pavement. https://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/news/burnley/1954394.drink-driver---riding-3mph-scooter/

Interestingly, in the UK, in an amendment in the 90s, mechanically propelled vehicle replaced motor vehicle in the legislation, but clearly, even the CPS see it as open to interpretation. The wording being identical to that in Manx law.

Of course, if little old Doris was banned from driving after a few too many sherries and a mobility scooter incident, that still wouldn't preclude her from further using her mobility scooter anyway, because, you don't need a license for one anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...