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DESC has no policy for student Furbies


Gladys
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Well, identifying as an animal, I suppose,  can cover a spectrum from self indulgence to an underlying clinical mental health issue.  If at the latter end, then it needs support and help.  At the former, it needs nothing other than being told to behave and conform to the rules of the school (reports on FB of kids scratching other kids, how true?) with no further time and resource spent on it. 

Buggers up the classic "dog ate my homework, miss" excuse though.

Edited by Gladys
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18 minutes ago, Gladys said:

Well, identifying as an animal, I suppose,  can cover a spectrum from self indulgence to an underlying clinical mental health issue.  If at the latter end, then it needs support and help.  At the former, it needs nothing other than being told to behave and confirm to the rules of the school (reports on FB of kids scratching other kids, how true?)  With no further time and resource spent on it. 

Buggers up the classic "dog ate my homework, miss" excuse though.

Last time I took the piss out of a furbie I got a ban but you point out the complete ridiculousness of things that most people see and yes it’s generally suggestive of underlying mental health issues. But maybe they should be indulged more? Tell the school dinner lady only to serve them pal or whiskers at lunchtime. Then maybe they’d change their stupid attention seeking behaviour when it’s pointed out that dogs are supposed to eat dog food and you aren’t a real dog then are you if you don’t like dog food? The fact is too that this is a small Island and what might seem funny or attention seeking now isn’t going to be in 20 years time when you’re sat in a pub and someone you went to school with goes - oh look there’s John. He used to identify as a puppy at school. ****king idiot. These sort of daft things will be with you for life in the IOM. 

Edited by offshoremanxman
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I'll probably be slammed for this, but one way of determining if it is a real mental health issue: put them in a room with lots of spiders.  If they run out screaming, it's self-indulgence.  If they come out licking their lips, we have a real issue. 

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6 minutes ago, Gladys said:

I'll probably be slammed for this, but one way of determining if it is a real mental health issue: put them in a room with lots of spiders.  If they run out screaming, it's self-indulgence.  If they come out licking their lips, we have a real issue. 

They wonder why they currently have a problem with discipline in schools and then you read something like this. Within 24 hours of self declaring like this the whole family should get a visit from CAHMS and leave it at that. It’s got nothing to do with the school having to accommodate to meet its ‘inclusivity’ targets. 

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There were furries at school when I was a kid. Or as the MR article put it before the correction, members of the "fury" subculture. The "identify as" thing is a red herring though. Furries just like dressing up as anthropomorphised animals. It's a persona. They don't actually believe they're cats.

Article reads like MR have been trying to stir shit up for clicks to be honest.

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7 minutes ago, HeliX said:

There were furries at school when I was a kid. Or as the MR article put it before the correction, members of the "fury" subculture. The "identify as" thing is a red herring though. Furries just like dressing up as anthropomorphised animals. It's a persona. They don't actually believe they're cats.

Article reads like MR have been trying to stir shit up for clicks to be honest.

Fair enough, I did wonder.  But that article does sound as though there are students wanting to be seen as animals.  

I don't have a problem with dressing up,  it's a bit like creating a cartoon character.  I don't understand it, but each to their own and as long as they don't start wanting special treatment in setting like school, crack on.  

Anthropomorphism I thought meant embuing animals with human traits, not the other way round. 

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Adults, whether parents or teachers already have an overriding “policy” 

That is - a duty and responsibility towards children to educate, guide and protect them whilst gradually introducing them to  harsher realities of the world with the aim of building  sufficient emotional resilience  that they are equipped to  face and deal with difficulties they will undoubtedly later encounter and also have a degree of insight that will help in their future relationships  and happiness.

To have a policy for “furries” would not be a “policy” .

At best , a  farcical nonsense  based on a silly  indulgence .

At worst it could be damaging, depriving students from receiving  the above.

 

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8 minutes ago, Gladys said:

Anthropomorphism I thought meant embuing animals with human traits, not the other way round. 

Normal animal:

1200px-Cat03.jpg

 


Anthropomorphised animal:

Anthro_vixen_colored.jpg

Person dressed as anthropomorphised animal:

aurora-bloom-2-jpg-1579817827.jpg

 

Edited by HeliX
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