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More uselessness from DBC


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44 minutes ago, offshoremanxman said:

It doesn’t. It’s all about them trying to save on gate fees at the EFW Plant and nothing else.

They wont save on gate fees if all the bins are twice as full as normal. The wagon today will be filling up more quickly and making twice as many trips to the EFW plant as before. All the bins are bursting

 

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Edited by Happier diner
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@Amadeus: 

* There was presumably a study that concluded that 100% generic black-bin waste would translate neatly into 50% recyclable waste and 50% other. Would it be possible to see a copy of that study and its conclusions?
* There will have been an impact assessment made, that predicted the risks of the change and their mitigations. Can we see that?
* Would it be possible to get a link to the public consultation that was conducted?
* Would you be able to publish the guidance to householders that was issued (I was one of those who missed it)?

Finally, would you be so kind as to indicate the names of the elected officials who proposed this reform (I'm not interested in those who supported it or voted for it, but those who brought it to the agenda) so that I can hold people to account in the next local elections?

Thank you.

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15 hours ago, Roger Mexico said:

But that highlights the problem.  If Douglas is decades behind, then it can't catch up overnight and people need to be guided very carefully through the process.  They need to know what they should do in detail, where they can go for exact information, when things will be collected and so on.  Even existing procedures need to be reiterated (not least because Douglas has a population that 'turns over' faster than elsewhere.  Special arrangements for blocks of flats and HMOs need to be sorted out and so on.

It's no good just communicating that something will be happening or even why.  People need to know the practicalities and have easy access to information.  But there's very little on the website and the Facebook stuff is a bit haphazard (as F/B inevitably is).  Bin stickers have been mentioned as a possible help, but could cards with the schedules for the forthcoming months have been put out?  Leaflets on how recycling should work? 

Ridiculous comment. Guided carefully? I just googled Douglas bin collections and found all the information within seconds. I don't even live in Douglas but know all about the reduction in bin collections because it's been all over the news.

I am lobbying my local council to reduce to fortnightly collections as well. Sick of the sight of my lazy neighbours bulging bins that are full of recyclables. Some people have to be forced to behave like adults and reducing bin collections has been shown to work well in doing this.

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1 minute ago, HiVibes said:

Lol, no one votes for them anyway, any oddball can walk in.

The main thing that seems to be apparent for a lot of Douglas residents is that David Christian set a fairly low bar when it came to expectation. But a few of the new guys seem to have limbo’d under that low bar nonetheless. If they weren’t on Twitter or Facebook all day talking bollocks then some of their inaction might be overlooked. But as it is you can’t seem to move online without some of them making daily pronouncements about nothing which just reinforces some peoples views that they’re really doing bugger all but trying to make a name for themselves while doing pretty much nothing for the ratepayers they represent.

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2 minutes ago, Raffles said:

Ridiculous comment. Guided carefully? I just googled Douglas bin collections and found all the information within seconds. I don't even live in Douglas but know all about the reduction in bin collections because it's been all over the news.

I am lobbying my local council to reduce to fortnightly collections as well. Sick of the sight of my lazy neighbours bulging bins that are full of recyclables. Some people have to be forced to behave like adults and reducing bin collections has been shown to work well in doing this.

I'd agree, the information is readily available. But I'm not sure that this is non-adult behaviour. A weekly bin collection is not unreasonable for a local authority - indeed it's one of the main reasons that residents pay rates to the local authority, and one of its main functions.

I'm an advocate for environmentalism, but also a realist. The recycling dynamic doesn't work in the way you think. People work on least-effort where they're not adequately motivated, which is why centralised recycling schemes work better. A fair number of residents will now be either burning their waste (recyclables and all), fly-tipping it, dumping it in other people's bins, or taking it down to the civic amenity site, which is simply moving the problem, rather than resolving it. Making it difficult to dispose of your waste doesn't simply encourage people to recycle, it encourages them to find a way to solve the problem, and that might not be an ethical, green way. Waste should be incinerated at the incinerator, with the filters to manage the toxic emissions, rather than being dumped out of chimneys and in galvanised B&Q Incinerators around Douglas.

A bin collection round is far more fuel-efficient and generates lower emissions than hundreds of residents making trips to the amenity site, where the waste is amalgamated and moved to the incinerator in a similar way to the bin collections.

Although the "recycle now" site makes bold assertions about  "saving the planet" as a motivation, it's not clear how this is to be done. The UK as a whole makes up just over 1% of global carbon dioxide emissions, and the IOM a tiny fraction of that. Political pressure is being applied by various groups to force the IOM to adhere to a reduced carbon dioxide "budget", but even if the IOM reduced its carbon dioxide emissions to zero, the net effect on global temperature rise would also be zero. This isn't "saving the planet".

Recycling on a small island is not as efficient as you think. According to the "recycle now" pages, the only local recycling is for glass, which is ground up for road surfacing. everything else is shipped to the UK, and transported by road to various operators around the UK from where it disappears into a supply chain.

A recent experiment in the UK tracked soft plastics that were given to a reputable recycling scheme run by Tesco. The "recycled" items passed through a number of handlers and dealers and made long journeys over Europe. One of the tracked plastic items ended up in Poland, where it was incinerated for heat generation at a cement plant. Another item was shipped to Turkey, where it was dumped in an illegal landfill. It would be interesting to run a similar experiment with IOM recyclables.  

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