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Charles Flynn

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About Charles Flynn

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Douglas, Isle of Man
  • Interests
    Health, religion, politics, economics,sport, science, environment, town planning, conservation, culture, history.

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  1. I don't think it's really a shame. With a few notable exceptions (such as engineering and law) university is primarily about education, not vocational training. The basic 'skills' you happen to pick up along the way are common to the vast bulk of degree courses, namely the ability to analyse, reason and construct and present arguments for your conclusion at a high level are generic, and there's no real reason why someone should go into a degree course intending to enter their chosen subject in a professional capacity. A large number of university applicants' main aspiration is to secure graduate level employment. For this they require three or four years in higher education and it makes sense that they will choose to study a subject they enjoy (and perhaps is related to their preferred area of employment), without necessarily wanting to work in that exact discipline for the rest of their lives. I'm not sure what you mean by this. We don't live in a full on command economy where someone forcasts the number of graduates needed for a certain discipline and then allocates so many places at each university for that subject - the number of places available tends to be influenced primarly by the number of applicants and the amount of funding. If people aren't taking up STEM subjects, it's not because of wonky forecasts or what have you. The reason such subjects attract less applications is as decades old: the subjects simply don't appeal to the vast majority of people and aren't prerequisites for the bulk of graduate jobs. Many courses these days are vocational and certainly in my profession and from my personal experience of others regular surveys are done to decide the future needs for graduates. However it used to be the case that a university course was seen as intrinsically valuable but I believe - may be you know better - those days,with currently so many more universities and undergraduates, are long past in this competitive world,
  2. Waste of life comments reminds me of all those people who you can see going to work from a city railway station - most rushing to get there on time, most looking completely drained. Perhaps we should be very thankful we live in the Isle of Man.
  3. No one should think a so-called menial job is beneath them. There is much value is doing menial work - learning how to interact with others which is valuable experience in any work situation. No matter what life brings we should never think we are too good to do the most boring jobs. My first job as a pharmacist graduate was dusting the counter. I feel privileged to have been trusted with the task.
  4. It is a shame so many students study courses and then abandon the subject. Hopefully there is some residual benefit in knowing about say engineering and becoming a banker. The responsibility to some extent must lie with those who forecast the projected need for graduates. I wonder whether in four years time many of those who have commenced business, marketing and related degrees will still be needed. I hope the forecasts are accurate.
  5. Well all of us know we are in an untenable position. Our aspirations of upward growth and perpetual prosperity have taken quite a knock. There is a worldwide economic downturn which has been dramatically worsened here because of the need for the UK government to look after its immediate concerns. Students have been rushing like leemings into studies which are not really needed in such huge numbers. Engineers, mathematicians,scientists, economists are but sadly these courses have been sidelined. So many have degrees which have little value in the jobs market - only the exceptional or the lucky are guaranteed employment in their speciality. So what does our future hold? Has anyone in Government really got any idea? Has anyone produced a comprehensive study of all the options? Possibly we can no longer afford the consultants! Even if such a study was completed would our Government have the courage to tell us the findings. The present policy seems to be 'steady as she goes'.... down!
  6. Your reasons are sound. Obviously few will be attracted to a group who have not thought out their policies and what would happen if they are implemented. Most people usually go for evolution not revolution. But what will it be this time? To change the Isle of Man so that long standing ties are almost completely severed would indeed be revolutionary. However there is no doubt that our relationship to the UK is changing in a way which would appear to be very unfair, indeed brutal from the island's point of view. A 25% reduction of income could be catastrophic. The ending of the reciprocal health agreement will be very distressing to individuals who are less well off and those with serious medical conditions as well as to the population at large living on this island and those who wish to visit us for whatever reason. The effect on what some see as an alternative to the finance sector i.e. the tourist industry could be ruinous. The main point I would wish to make is that the young people who are passionate about the island and who want to see it standing more on its three legs do need to be cherished and should be aware of all the arguments so that their enthusiasm and efforts will be for the good of our people whom I regard as all the residents not just a small sector with vested interests. Let them talk to a wide assortment of people and then they can make their minds up on what is possible as we stand at the cross roads of where we should go for justice, fairness and the general well being of our small island nation.
  7. Thank you for this.... There must be balance between passion and reason but politics is not an exact science. We do not want the whole fabric of society being ripped up but now and again anger at what is going on - incompetence, unfairness etc causes new groupings and individuals to initiate changes and policies which can be beneficial. It seems to me that we are at a time when some of our long cherished ideas on this island will need to be amended. Perhaps the young people can see this more clearly than the establishment can even if as yet they have not formulated precise policies.
  8. It's a pity then that all we've seen so far is bluster and empty sloganeering. I'd applaud it if there were some sign that this had been thought through and their beliefs reasoned, but so far it all smacks of attention seeking and setting up a mildly provocative bandwagon. I suggest that to be an aspiring politician you should have passion. Reasoned arguments and policies come in the course of time for some - unfortunately not for all.
  9. I thought her Courier interview showed her to be a young lady of some character. She has a sense of humour and has a down to earth attitude. I applaud the guts of the young people for standing up for what they believe even if they upset others. Hopefully they will not be influenced too much by those who accept the status quo and see no reason why it should change.
  10. Hi Charles, i have had some advice from the nurse who comes around. It has been caused by the chemotherapy which stops rapidly dividing cells from mulitiplying. Although this affects the cancer, it also affects the skin, blood etc but they recover quickly and the cancer doesn't. That is why the blood may be back to normal levels next week, but I'm just trying to give them an extra boost with food. He is having a prescribed supplemental drink which tastes not exactly great. He has been having tomato soup whichI didn't think had much in it, so I'm grateful for you putting me right on that. I have to increase his protein as well. Fillet steak for tea, black pudding and liver for breakfast and it will depend on Toms appetite after that. Best Wishes Barbara Sounds good!
  11. Barbara, This needs expert professional help. I do not believe you can do much without it as there are so many different causes. Obviously tomatoes is an example of an iron rich food. There are many more but it will take time to improve the haemoglobin levels. Best wishes to you and Tom
  12. Like millions throughout the world I worshipped the Birth of Christ at Christ-mass last evening. The number of families of ordinary people joining in the celebrations over Advent and Christmas reveals that on this island those who deny Christ's message and portray people of faith as deluded are portraying a picture of island life which does not reflect the true picture. Christ is Alive! More than ever His message of love is needed. We should not live for ourselves but for others, sharing with our neighbours the gifts we have been given. Be thankful for your gifts and for those given to others. We can give thanks in the words of ’A Christmas Prayer’ by Robert Louis Stevenson: Loving Father, Help us remember the birth of Jesus, That we may share in the song of the angels, The gladness of the shepherds, And worship of the wise men. Close the door of hate and open the door of love all over the world. Let kindness come with every gift and good desires with every greeting. Deliver us from evil by the blessing which Christ brings, and teach us to be merry with clear hearts. May the Christmas morning make us happy to be thy children, and Christmas evening bring us to our beds with grateful thoughts, forgiving and forgiven, for Jesus’ sake. Amen. May you and yours enjoy a Joyful and Blessed Christmas.
  13. Like millions throughout the world I worshipped the Birth of Christ at Christ-mass last evening. The number of families of ordinary people joining in the celebrations over Advent and Christmas reveals that on this island those who deny Christ's message and portray people of faith as deluded are portraying a picture of island life which does not reflect the true picture. Christ is Alive! More than ever His message of love is needed. We should not live for ourselves but for others, sharing with our neighbours the gifts we have been given. Be thankful for your gifts and for those given to others. We can give thanks in the words of ’A Christmas Prayer’ by Robert Louis Stevenson: Loving Father, Help us remember the birth of Jesus, That we may share in the song of the angels, The gladness of the shepherds, And worship of the wise men. Close the door of hate and open the door of love all over the world. Let kindness come with every gift and good desires with every greeting. Deliver us from evil by the blessing which Christ brings, and teach us to be merry with clear hearts. May the Christmas morning make us happy to be thy children, and Christmas evening bring us to our beds with grateful thoughts, forgiving and forgiven, for Jesus’ sake. Amen. May you and yours enjoy a Joyful and Blessed Christmas.
  14. Generally this would be welcomed by the profession as really it is just another extension of our present role. Pharmacists are experts in medicines and have a track record of supplying medicines such as emergency hormonal oral contraception over-the-counter and via Patient Group Directions. They already have the clinical skills and expertise that will help them provide information and advice to women to ensure the appropriate use of oral contraception. Supplying the oral contraceptive via a Patient Group Direction will widen and improve patient choice, access and convenience. Community pharmacies are easily accessible with no need for an appointment and located in places where people live, work and shop. Pharmacies also have convenient opening hours, often including the evenings and weekends when GP surgeries are closed. Regarding the necessary health checks, such as blood pressure testing and healthy lifestyle checks, these are already a part of pharmacist’s extended role. There is a pilot study in London ready to start next year so if this is successful it is likely at some stage it will happen on the island.
  15. MEN’S MACHO ATTITUDE COULD COST 40,000 LIVES PER YEAR Community pharmacy could hold the key to saving the lives of 40,000 men every year*. New research from the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain (RPSGB) could shed light on the reasons behind the poor state of men’s health in Britain. The RPSGB commissioned study, designed to discover how men’s attitudes might affect their healthcare, revealed that 59% of men are reluctant to ask for help and only seek medical advice if they are ‘very ill or in great pain’. This factor is compounded by their commitment to looking macho and could contribute towards reducing their life expectancy by up to five years*. The research showed that almost two in five men (39%) believe that crying during films is not a manly trait, and one in six claimed that revealing a vulnerable side to their partner was a not anoption for them. Under general circumstances, asking for help is considered not to be a macho characteristic, particularly when changing a tyre (33%), requiring directions (13%) or needing medical advice (7%). One in seventeen men (6%) revealed that they believe they will beconsidered ‘soft’ if seeking medical help and one in seven (14%) were afraid of what they might be told. Despite men’s life expectancy in comparison to women’s improving over the last 20 years, the gap decreasing from 5.8 years to 4.3 years**, there is still a significant difference between the sexes. If men looked after themselves better and their life expectancy was as high aswomen’s, it is estimated that 40,000 less men would die each year. David Pruce, the RPSGB’s Director of Policy, said: “Men’s health has been improving over the last 20 years and this is very much down to a change in habits – men are smoking less and paying much better attention to their diets. What we need now is a change in attitude. Men need to snap out of the ‘big boys don’t cry’ mind-set and start taking health problems seriously. “The statistics show that the greatest threat to a man’s health is still himself! We really need to get men into the habit of getting themselves checked out by a health professional moreregularly. Men are at much greater risk than women of developing chronic illnesses like heart and respiratory disease – partly due to not being diagnosed early enough. “Men are often reluctant to visit their GP but visit a pharmacy quite regularly to pick up everyday essentials like aftershave, condoms and vitamins. While they are there, guys should speak to their pharmacist and ask them for advice or a health check – it’s so easy. There is no need for an appointment and most have private consultation rooms for discreet assessments. “The pharmacy is a great place to start. It’s free and they will always refer people to a GP if necessary. Charles Flynn, Secretary of the IOM Branch of The Royal Pharmaceuticl Society says:"It is a very important message affecting men and their families. The pharmacy is easy and convenient to go to and the pharmacist and his/her staff are keen to help and improve the health and the life expectancy of men. All advice is professional and freely available. It is confidential. Please men, take advantage of your local pharmacy. I promise it will be time well spent on the most important person in your life -YOU". Men’s health – the facts**: • Five thousand people are severely injured in accidents every year in the UK, 75% of them men. Males also score heavily in other indicators of aggression and rebellion - four times as many take their own lives compared to women and men make up 88% ofall drug offenders • Men are more likely than women to be overweight and the majority of men are tooheavy: 45% are medically defined as overweight and an additional 17% as obese • 28% of men still smoke • 27% of men drink alcohol at a level that could be harmful to their health • The suicide rate among men is increasing. The rate has doubled among 15–24 year olds in the past 25 years• Men are more likely than women to be mentally ill • Compared to the wider population, Indian, Bangladeshi, Black, Caribbean and Irishmen are at greater risk of heart disease and stroke Men’s health case studyA case study, Pharmacists convince men to take health seriously, is available via http://www.rpsgb.org/pdfs/pharmcasestudymenshealth.pdf, outlining the work of pharmacy in men’s health at Knowlsey Primary Care Trust, Merseyside. About the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain (RPSGB) The RPSGB is the professional and regulatory body for pharmacists in England, Scotland and Wales. It also regulates pharmacy technicians on a voluntary basis, which is expected to become statutory under anticipated legislation. The primary objectives of the RPSGB are to lead, regulate, develop and represent the profession of pharmacy.The RPSGB leads and supports the development of the profession within the context of the public benefit. This includes the advancement of science, practice, education and knowledge in pharmacy. In addition, it promotes the profession’s policies and views to a range of external stakeholders in a number of different forums. Following the publication in 2007 of the Government White Paper Trust, Assurance and Safety - The Regulation of Health Professionals in the 21st Century, the RPSGB is working towards the demerger of its regulatory and professional roles. This will see the establishment of a new General Pharmaceutical Council and a new professional body for pharmacy in 2010. Website: www.rpsgb.orgRPSGB research Original RPSGB research carried out by YouGov between 10 – 13 October, interviewing 1981 UK adults (951 men and 1030 women). Raw data available on request. References*Office for National Statistics. 2005 figures show by age 80 there are 143,238 male deaths and 104,539 female deaths (male excess 38699) **Sources: NHS Direct, www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk; Men’s Health Forum, www.menshealthforum.org.uk
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